Vela

Creative nonfiction, inspired by travel, written by women

think-progress:


But the wage gap varies significantly by race, according to an analysis from the research organization AAUW. While white women experienced that 78 percent figure, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander women made 65 percent of what white men made in 2013, African-American women made 64 percent, American Indian and Alaska Native women made 59 percent, and Hispanic women made just 54 percent. Asian-American women are the only group doing better than white women, making 90 percent of white men’s earnings.

Woah, staggering.

think-progress:

But the wage gap varies significantly by race, according to an analysis from the research organization AAUW. While white women experienced that 78 percent figure, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander women made 65 percent of what white men made in 2013, African-American women made 64 percent, American Indian and Alaska Native women made 59 percent, and Hispanic women made just 54 percent. Asian-American women are the only group doing better than white women, making 90 percent of white men’s earnings.

Woah, staggering.

0 1,111 notes Reblogged from Think Progress
A phenomenal Women We Read This Week, with reporting and essays about rape culture in Alaska, vegan activism, the era of school shootings, the hope for a united front in feminism, and childhood friendship in the segregated South. Today’s roundup will keep you busy — and engaged — all weekend!

A phenomenal Women We Read This Week, with reporting and essays about rape culture in Alaska, vegan activism, the era of school shootings, the hope for a united front in feminism, and childhood friendship in the segregated South. Today’s roundup will keep you busy — and engaged — all weekend!

readandbreathe:

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The 2014 Longlist for the National Book Award for Nonfiction was announced today, and it’s a very disappointing and stodgy list . Roz Chast is on there (yay!) but it says something about one of the most prestigious literary awards in America that the judges chose NINE books by men and one…

0 38 notes Reblogged from Michele Filgate
theparisreview:

“Abortion has been around as long as pregnancy, and our responsibility is to let it be complex and to make it safe and accessible. And most of all to not question people when they choose abortion—to let them be the experts on their own lives.”
An interview with Merritt Tierce on her debut novel, teenage pregnancy, and writing sex scenes.

theparisreview:

“Abortion has been around as long as pregnancy, and our responsibility is to let it be complex and to make it safe and accessible. And most of all to not question people when they choose abortion—to let them be the experts on their own lives.”

An interview with Merritt Tierce on her debut novel, teenage pregnancy, and writing sex scenes.

0 244 notes Reblogged from The Paris Review
It’s a feeling of happiness that knocks me clean out of adjectives. I think sometimes that the best reason for writing novels is to experience those four and a half hours after you write the final word.
Zadie Smith 
"By the end of my first summer, I was sketching flying saucers on the visitor center weather calendar."
Erica Watson on moving to Denali and the blurry line between choice and habit in this week’s feature, The Postcard Days. 

"By the end of my first summer, I was sketching flying saucers on the visitor center weather calendar."

Erica Watson on moving to Denali and the blurry line between choice and habit in this week’s feature, The Postcard Days. 

Today on Women We Read This Week: Afghan girls who live as boys, a lone whale that sings at an unheard of frequency, a lifetime of sartorial choices, and Roxane Gay on being a bad feminist.

Today on Women We Read This Week: Afghan girls who live as boys, a lone whale that sings at an unheard of frequency, a lifetime of sartorial choices, and Roxane Gay on being a bad feminist.

theparisreview:

“In our own lives, how do we get ourselves to think about how we think and why we think it? And then, of course, that’s the place essays come from. And where all writing comes from.”
An interview with Lynne Tillman.

theparisreview:

“In our own lives, how do we get ourselves to think about how we think and why we think it? And then, of course, that’s the place essays come from. And where all writing comes from.”

An interview with Lynne Tillman.

0 93 notes Reblogged from The Paris Review
In what is sometimes called the “restaurant model” of medicine, the paternalism of doctors has been replaced by the consumerism of patients. We order tests and treatments from a menu based on our consumer research. And the doctor, who was a father in the paternalistic model, is now a waiter. The idea that the customer is always right, imported to medicine, is a dangerous dictum. “If you keep telling people it’s just a marketplace and that they’re just clients and that autonomy of the patient is what must be served to make them happy customers,” the bioethicist Arthur Caplan warns, “then you have a collapse of professionalism in the face of consumer demand.” Doctors may be tempted to give patients what we want, even when it is not good for us.
"Mark a dot on a map, take a picture, thank the man who brought you there: ‘Never in my sweet short life have I felt like this before.’ Easy."
In this week’s feature, Erica Watson writes on moving to Denali, the blurred line between habit and choice, and finding rhythm: The Postcard Days. 

"Mark a dot on a map, take a picture, thank the man who brought you there: ‘Never in my sweet short life have I felt like this before.’ Easy."

In this week’s feature, Erica Watson writes on moving to Denali, the blurred line between habit and choice, and finding rhythm: The Postcard Days.